Vinci-LV Li-ion Battery Management System

ESS BMS for large, low voltage batteries and arrays

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Outstanding versatility, feature rich Li-ion Battery Management System

  • 24 to 48 V Energy Storage Systems (ESS)
  • Li-ion or lead acid
  • Arrays of up to 100 batteries in parallel
  • Complete: just add cells
  • Off the shelf, stocked, as low as $ 350

A member of the Vinci BMS family.

Vinci LV master
Vinci LV battery master
Stationary
  • Solar installations
  • UPSs
    • Telecomm sites
    • Computer server farms
    • Pole mount
Mobile
  • House power
    • Marine
    • Auxiliary Power Units (APU) for trucks
    • Aviation
  • Job-site power
  • Portable devices

For applications other than low voltage batteries, see other Vinci BMS families

Single battery:

  • 24 to 48 V
  • Up to 16 Li-ion cells in series
  • Any chemistry
  • 2 to 4 lead-acid batteries (12 V) in series
  • Positive or negative ground, or isolated
  • Energy (@ 100 %) or power (@ 50 %)
  • Up to 16 strings permanently in parallel*

Array of batteries:

  • Up to 63 batteries in parallel
  • Safe connection to bus (no inrush)
  • Managed as a single unit
  • Li-ion and lead acid hybrid on same bus
  • Requires N+1 modules for N batteries

Physical:

  • Centralized (1 case)
  • Rugged, sealed, industrial grade packaging

Sensing:

  • Wired (voltage tap wires to cells)
  • Distributed (cell moudules on cells)*
  • Bullet-proof against tap mis-connection
  • Hall Effect or shunt current sensing
  • Up to 5 thermistors

Balancing:

  • Top or mid, SoC based
  • Dissipative ("passive")
  • Charge transfer (active)
    (not bullet-proof)*

Protector switch:

  • Isolated MOSFET gate drivers
  • Drivers for contactors or latching relay
  • Internal precharge
    driver for external precharge
  • 20 A internal protector*
  • 20 A to 1000 A external sensors and protectors*

Evaluation:

  • SoC (State of Charge)
    SoP (State of Power)
    SoH (State of Health)
    SoF (State of Function)
  • Pack isolation
  • Data logging

Communications:

  • Isolated CAN communication link
  • USB port for troubleshooting
  • Field configurable through GUI
  • One of:*
    • XanBus™
    • ModBus RTU (RS485)
    • ModBus TCP-IP (Ethernet)
    • RS232
    • WiFi (Access point or station)

(*) Option

XanBus is a trademark of Schneider Electric.

Block diagram
Block diagram
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  • Single battery
  • 16 LiFePo4 Li-ion prismatic cells in series: 48 V
  • 20 A max current: protector switch inside BMS master
  • 17 wires to the 16 cells to sense voltage
  • Fitted with optional XanBus™ interface for Scheider Electric invereter
Block diagram
48 V battery with XanBus™
  • Single battery
  • 7 NMC Li-ion prismatic cells in series: 24 V
  • 50 A max current: current sensor inside BMS master, external contactor
  • Fitted with optional RS485 interface for MODBUS RTU
Block diagram
24 V battery with MODBUS
  • Single battery with 2 strings permanently connected in parallel
  • 7 NMC Li-ion prismatic cells in series in each string: 24 V
  • 20 A max current: protector switch inside BMS master
  • Each slave handles one string, with 8 wires to the 7 cells to sense voltage
Block diagram
Battery with parallel strings
  • Array of 3 batteries
  • Array managed by an Array Master
  • Array Master fitted with optional RS485 interface for MODBUS RTU
  • Each battery managed by a Battery Master
  • Each string consists of 14 NMC Li-ion prismatic cells in series: 48 V
  • For each battery, 15 wires to the 14 cells to sense voltage
Block diagram
Battery array
  • Array of mixed batteries
  • Array managed by an Array Master
  • Array Master fitted with optional XanBus™ interface for Scheider Electric invereter
  • Each battery managed by a Battery Master
  • First string consists of 7 NMC Li-ion prismatic cells in series: 24 V
  • For first battery, 8 wires to the 7 cells to sense voltage
  • Second string consists of two 12 V lead acid batteries in series: 24 V
  • For second battery, 3 wires to the 2 batteries to sense voltage
Block diagram
Mixed battery array

XanBus is a trademark of Schneider Electric.

To design a BMS for your high voltage stationary battery, start by selecting one of these 2 topologies or contact us for help:

  • Wired, Centralized: A wire to each cell, one single module
  • Distributed, VinciBus: A module on each cell, fiber-optic to the Master
  • Wired, VinciLink: A wire to each cell, 2-wires between adjacent slaves; for strings permanently in parallel

A single module performs all the BMS functions; it senses cell voltages through a number of tap wires.

The BMS consists of:

  • A Centralized Battery Master
  • Up to 2 current sensors
  • A power switch (contactors or MOSFETs)
  • Optionally, to manage an array of batteries as a single unit, an Array Master

Detailed technical Info

Click to order

Block diagram
Centralized topology

A single Battery Master module performs most BMS functions.

A cell module is mounted on each prismatic cell to measure and report voltage and temperature.

The Battery Master is connected to the 2 cell module at the end of the battery through 2 small cables.

The BMS consists of:

  • A Centralized Battery Master
  • One cell module per cell
  • Up to 2 current sensors
  • A power switch (contactors or MOSFETs)
  • To manage an array of batteries as a single unit, an Array Master

Detailed technical Info

Click to order Block diagram
Distributed topology

This topology is for batteries that have strings connected directly and permanently in parallel. (If not, each string forms a separate battery, each requiring its own BMS.)

The BMS uses a Master/Slave topology, consisting of a Master and a number of modules; communication between them is through a 2-wire daisy chain.

The Slaves sense cell voltages through a number of tap wires.

The BMS consists of:

  • A Battery Master
  • A number of VinciLink Slaves
  • Up to 2 current sensors
  • A power switch (contactors or MOSFETs)
  • To manage an array of batteries as a single unit, an Array Master

Detailed technical Info

Click to order

Block diagram
VinciLink topology for strings in parallel

 

Centralized
Wired, single module
Distributed
Distributed, single module
VinciLink
Wired, Master + extra slaves
Block diagram Block diagram Block diagram
Click to order Click to order Click to order
Application Recommendations
Small battery
Large
battery
Prismatic
Other
2 boxes Prismatic
Other
Strings in parallel
Feature Comparison
Cell sensing
Distributed vs wired
Wired: For N cells, N+1 voltage tap wires go from the slave to the cells. Distributed: Cells are divided into banks of up to 25 cells.
A cell module is mounted on each cell.
Two 2-wire cables go from the Slave to the two cell modules at the to ends of the bank.
Wired: For each slave, for N cells, N+1 voltage tap wires go from the slave to the cells.
Slave to Master N.A. N.A. VinciLink
A Linear daisy chain (twisted pair) runs between the Master and the first VinciLink slave; one between each pair of adjacent VinciLink slaves.
Strings in parallel N.A. Up to 16 strings connected directly and permanently in parallel.
Note: if not connected directly and permanently in parallel, they are separate batteries, each requiring its own BMS.
Pros & cons
Pros
  • All-in-one unit
  • Any cell format
  • Simple wiring for large batteries
  • One temperature sensor per cell
  • Supports strings in parallel
  • Any cell format
Cons
  • Long wires for large batteries
  • Few temperature sensors
  • Not for strings in parallel
  • Multiple assemblies
  • Limited to large prismatic cells
  • Not for strings in parallel
  • Multiple assemblies
  • Few temperature sensors

 

 
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